Category Archives: abstract expressionism

Thinking Aloud – experimenting with paint and colour


Weds 25th October, 1st and 29th November

10.00am – 4.00pm

£155/3 days

How can you take your painting forwards?

Do you get frustrated, and possibly a bit bored by your paintings?

untitled blue 1

How do you take a step sideways in order to move forwards? You know what you want to say, but not how you want to say it.  You may get tighter when you want to get looser, or looser when you want more control.

The more time you spend painting the more you know there are other things out there you can’t quite reach.

And what about abstraction? Different palettes? Different media? Supports? Intuition? And every other sort of variation on a theme.

This course will be short, but exciting. It will encourage you to make mistakes, and to enjoy them, to play and learn. I’m not too worried about what media you want to use –  the idea is to experiment, play, discuss and try new things.

Each day will have a different theme and build on the previous day. You will be encouraged to do some research in between classes.

These three days will be more about the process of using paint and colour,  than about the destination.

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Azalea Garden, May 1956 – detail Patrick Heron

Thinking Aloud would be appropriate for more experienced artists.

For more information contact Kate Measham

What would the Fauves do?


The Fauves wanted to pique the emotions by reducing forms to their essentials and the use of often saturated colour. They were reacting to the Impressionist painters who worked just before them, and were particularly inspired by Van Gogh and Gauguin. The term Fauves is applied to a fairly loose group including amongst others  Derain, Matisse, Vlaminck, Dufy and early works from Kandinsky. Kandinsky went on to be a pioneer of the Abstract Expressionist – with a landmark exhibition just opened at the Royal Academy.

On Wednesday 28th September there is a course at the Riverside Yurt Cafe, Brandesbury, on the banks of the River Test. The BBC promise a sunny day and we will be looking at the beautiful setting asking “What would the Fauves do?”

Contact me for more details and availability kate@artdrawpaint.com

The course is from 9.30am – 4.00pm, £70 including a light lunch and coffee.

Abstract Expressionist Exhibition


 

I have taken this directly from the Royal Academy Website, but found the photos elsewhere

Abstract Expressionism at the Royal Academy, London

24 September 2016 — 2 January 2017

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Exploring an unparalleled period in American art, this long awaited exhibition reveals the full breadth of a movement that will forever be associated with the boundless creative energy of 1950s New York.

In the “age of anxiety” surrounding the Second World War and the years of free jazz and Beat poetry, artists like Pollock, Rothko and de Kooning broke from accepted conventions to unleash a new confidence in painting.Often monumental in scale, their works are at times intense, spontaneous and deeply expressive. At others they are more contemplative, presenting large fields of colour that border on the sublime. These radical creations redefined the nature of painting, and were intended not simply to be admired from a distance but as two-way encounters between artist and viewer.It was a watershed moment in the evolution of 20th-century art, yet, remarkably, there has been no major survey of the movement since 1959.

This autumn we bring together some of the most celebrated art of the past century, offering the chance to experience the powerful collective impact of Pollock, Rothko, Still, de Kooning, Newman, Kline, Smith, Guston and Gorky as their works dominate our galleries with their scale and vitality.

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We will also acknowledge the lesser-known figures who contributed to the development of the movement. Finally, we will include photography and sculpture to complete an ambitious re-evaluation of the phenomenon that saw New York take over from Paris as the capital of the art world.

The exhibition will be curated by the independent art historian Dr David Anfam, alongside Edith Devaney, Contemporary Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts. Dr Anfam is the preeminent authority on Abstract Expressionism, the author of the catalogue raisonné of Mark Rothko’s paintings and Senior Consulting Curator at the Clyfford Still Museum, Denver.