All posts by kate measham

I live in a house in the middle of ancient woods in Wiltshire. I paint and draw in my studio at home, and run a variety of classes from a studio in Wherwell Priory. In the late 1990s I took a degree in Visual Art through Drawing at Winchester School of Art and have run classes since 2007. If you want more information about the courses email me at kate@artdrawpaint.com I look forward to hearing from you

On the Shoulders of Giants


  • Wednesday 3rd July, 10.00am – 11.30am
  • £10/session or as part of your monthly Lockdown Art Club. Join our Lockdown Club for a discount with the online classes

The class will be via Zoom. You will be given your access code on the morning of the class. If you have not used this technology before please try to ‘arrive at the class’ before 9.50 so we can help you if you need help.



Although museums and galleries are closed to the public at the moment their catalogue of treasures are available at the click of a button. This is a wonderful opportunity to travel around time and space to look at some of the wonderful art of the world. You will build your work on the shoulders of giants.

This class is about looking at one of the fantastic creative works available and using it to your advantage. It is not about copying. Choose one work from the four pictures below, just because you like it. By the end of this class you will be on your way to making something from it that will be entirely your own.


Materials

  • tracing paper
  • photocopy of one of the pictures below
  • drawing materials, pencils, charcoal etc
  • large cartridge paper, a few sheets
  • quick and easy paints or something to apply colour

You will be working towards a final piece, looking at colour, line, composition, narrative, perspective, and anything else that arises.

Don’t let yourself feel you know the direction you wish to take before you start the process.

Be prepared to explore, investigate and let the picture lead you in a new direction.


On The Shoulders of Giants

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose 1885-6 John Singer Sargent 1856-1925
https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/sargent-carnation-lily-lily-rose-n01615

The Open Window, Collioure, 1905, Henri Matisse,
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.106384.html

The Hunt in the Forest, 1465, Paolo Uccello
https://www.ashmolean.org/hunt-forest

The Tea Plantation of Katakura in Suruga Province, 1830-34, Hokusai
https://honolulumuseum.org/art/9074-mount-fuji-from-the-tea-plantation-of-katakura-in-suruga-provincea_z



Life Drawing ONLINE


During lockdown we are trying to find ways to keep everyone enthused, and entertained. We hold regular Life Drawing classes at Hampshire Art studio – at least we used to.

Now we are using ZOOM to get back to what we enjoy doing, but with the occasional twist.

The session is divided into 2 halves (a footballing term apparently) with the first half being guided by Kate Measham. If you want to do you own thing you can turn down the volume and ignore her; if you are a beginner you might find some of her tips helpful. There will be a number of quick poses, followed by longer poses. The second half will be one pose.

This week our model will be wearing something akin to a swimming costume. In the sessions to come we will vary this approach.


Please join us for a fortnightly life drawing class via ZOOM. The dates of classes are:

  • April 29th 6-8pm
  • May 13th 6-8pm
  • May 27th 6-8pm
  • June 10th 6-8pm

  • We will send you a link to the class on the morning of each session. To allow you to see us all, and most importantly the model, make sure you have the ZOOM app downloaded, then click on the link.

    • The class will start at 6.05pm.  Please be ready BEFORE you log on, with paper, pencils, charcoal and whatever materials you want to use.
  • We will send you an invitation to you log on to the class from 6.00pm onwards.
  • From 6.05 we ask you all to ‘MUTE’ yourselves – there is a button on screen to do this.
  • Kate will instruct the model, so you should only hear their voices
  • If you click on the square that holds the model she will become the main picture.  You should be able to make her square occupy most, if not all of the screen. If you click on the three little dots in the top right hand corner of per square an click ‘pin’ in the drop down menu you should be ok.
  • The model will do a series of 1 minute poses, 2 minute poses and a  30 minute pose followed by a tea and wee break of 10-15 minutes.
  • Kate will offer guidance until half time. Please feel free to ignore it. We can all have a chat through the break – so demute at this stage
  • At approx 7.00 we will have a 45 min pose and then time to look and discuss each others pictures if you want to.
  • Please bring own wine!
  • Each session will cost £10 pp please


    Buy Class

    Spread the word to anyone you think would be interested in online life drawing

     If you are new to ZOOM and worried about the technology please tell us. We can do an orientation session for 20 mins before the class. If you want to do this you will need to tell us beforehand.

    THIS CLASS IS FREE FOR ANY FRONTLINE WORKERS – PLEASE PASS ON THE MESSAGE.

    They will need to register with us so we can send them the code but will not be charged.

    Gallery of Art, Curiosities and Treasures


    Kate Measham

    Music choices give away a lot about a person. It is a shorthand for all sorts of information about a person being interviewed, and often reveal a side you weren’t expecting. Not surprisingly BBC Radio Four’s Dessert Island Discs, and BBC Radio Three’s Private Passions are both hugely popular.

    I have started to ask people to create their own personal gallery of favourite art, treasures and objects of curiosity. Again, the answers are not necessarily what you would expect, and there are many reasons for the choices.

    This series of interviews starts with me. Hopefully it gives you an idea of what I am aiming at. Each person gets to choose 5 things – pictures, curiosities or treasures, and one bit of information, materials advice, ‘how to’, or whatever to pass on to others.


    Lucien Freud, And the Bridegroom

    This is a oil painting of Leigh Bowery, a regular model for Freud and Nicola Bowery, his wife.

    I first saw this painting at the Whitechapel Gallery in the 90s. It was placed at the bottom of some stairs and you were forced to move towards this intimate scene of a sated couple on their grubby, uninviting sheets. And so drawn to it.

    These photos of the two models and the final piece, by Bruce Bernard, look grim and staged, whereas the painting has a luminosity and warmth. I can’t imagine shouting in front of this work – they are so deeply asleep.

    Freud has accentuated the bride’s fragility and the macho spread of the husband. The folds of the cloth echo the limbs of the models. The golden light on the wall in the painting contrasts with the dark, architectural feel of the screen and seems to reflect the difference between the man and the woman. They are touching.

    I have seen the painting in various different galleries and I am always overwhelmed by it. This series of photographs describe why I enjoy Freuds interpretation of the scene. I love the painting.

    Nicolas Poussin, The Triumph of Pan

    The Dulwich Picture Gallery had an exhibition of works by Cy Twombly and Nicolas Poussin in 2011. I spent a day at the gallery drawing the pictures and falling in love with the works of both artists. One of my regrets is not having bought the book of the exhibition, Arcadian Painters.

    Nicolas Poussin, 1594 – 1665 The Triumph of Pan 1636 Oil on canvas, 135.9 x 146 cm Bought with contributions from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and The Art Fund, 1982 NG6477 https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG6477

    The Triumph of Pan is a masterclass in composition. I have drawn it and painted it a number of times. It is unbelievably complicated. Each new attempt appears doomed to failure, but that doesn’t seem to matter; I learn something new each time. The colour isn’t very exciting but EVERYTHING else is. Because of the trees in this picture I look at the screen in the Freud and see the importance of that structure in the background

    The other day I made a trip to the National Gallery to see the picture, and find the second goat. I hadn’t seen it for while, and it wasn’t on display. The Poussin Room had one Poussin. Is he so very out of fashion?


    Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm, no 30

    This is a great big drip picture. Lots has been written about it. I haven’t read anything about it

    One of the things I love to see in a picture is the presence of the artist. Sometimes you can tell whether the artist was left, or right handed, you can feel their attitude to the sitter in a portrait, you can see a battle with composition and errors in a drawing. These things pass to the viewer through time and show the humanity of all involved.

    In this work by Pollock you can feel his footsteps as he moves from one area to another, you feel the weight and direction of the paint. It is like a large scale doodle with instinctive marks and composition. And in addition there is the chaos of the paint.

    I have seen this piece in different places and I find myself sitting in front of it for great lengths of time, and striding along beside it, trying to match Pollocks steps.


    Ivon Hitchens, Pierre Bonnard, Paul Gauguin, Cezanne,

    This is a bit of a cheat – there is no one picture from any of the above. I look to some of them for interest in colour or pattern, others for composition, line, and the looser sort of figurative work.

    I think Ivon Hitchens would be surprised to represent this basket.

    This picture doesn’t have the overwhelming joy of pattern and colour of Bonnard. It seems to lack the narrative and colour of Gauguin, and the apparent lightness of touch of Cezanne. However, I feel the influence of all of them in this work.

    I love the combination of spontaneity and very deliberate marks. I love the slightly unusual shape of the canvas, encouraging you to explore. The colours make me think of spring in the English countryside.

    Who could not be happy to be greeted by this picture each morning?


    Sargy Mann, blind artist

    This appears to be another cheat.

    The Artist, Sargy Mann, went blind halfway through his life but he continued to paint. He was very keen on Bonnard and curated an exhibition at the Hayward.

    There is a short film made by Sargy Mann’s son about him going blind and discovering he could still paint by referring to his internal landscapes, memories and views. The colours he used after he went blind are joyful, vibrant and uncomplicated.

    It doesn’t matter if your tree is blue, the edges blurred, the drawing not photographically accurate. It should be true to you, what you see and how you want to represent it. Don’t edit yourself to someone else’s idea of what you should be able to see, but be ruthless, brave and true to yourself.

    The British painter Sargy Mann was diagnosed with cataracts at 36, and went on to lose his sight completely. But in his mind’s eye his vision did not fade. Mann found new ways to keep working. Even before he lost his sight, Sargy Mann was obsessed with ways of seeing. As a young painter he was tutored by singular realists – Frank Auerbach, Euan Uglow – who insisted that an individual artist must be exactly true to what he saw…

    Tim Adams, The Observer, 2010

    The bit of kit I regularly encourage others to use are the wonderful Anilinky, Brilliant Watercolours by Koh-i-noor. They are vibrant, bold, brash, fun and very cheap.


    It has been extremely tricky to choose so few pictures – indeed I need someone to tell me to stop faffing about and choose number four and five. I could argue that Hitchens is clearly a product of all those others. And Sargy Mann, whose work I admire hugely, is a reminder to get on with painting and to relish it.

    I have avoided the wonderful pictures by friends and relations, and those pictures that trigger memories unconnected to the works themselves.


    I would Love to hear about your gallery. Please, please send me the pictures and works that you return to time and again. I am making a series of different galleries of art, treasures and curiosities to reflective different influences on artists and those interested in art.

    Life Drawing, Picasso and Composition


    • with Kate Measham
    • Monday, 24th February, 2020
    • 2.00pm – 5.00pm
    • The Studio, Bransbury, nr Winchester
    • £40/session, model included

    unusual composition picasso

    Picasso quotes are 10 a penny on the internet. How many are genuine and how many are wishful thinking…who knows.

    Every act of creation is first of all an act of destruction.

    I love life drawing. However, I have noticed that life drawing, as with other drawing can get a little repetitive. This life drawing afternoon is aimed at a fresh look at life drawing.

    Everything you can imagine is real.

    Please bring with you your favourite drawing tools, to include masking tape, pritt stick, various sizes of charcoal and large cartridge paper (A1). This is available to purchase if you run out.

    This will be an exciting and invigorating afternoon of drawing.

    Others have seen what is and asked why. I have seen what could be and asked why not.

    Have a look at the Royal Academy exhibition details and link, Picasso on Paper