Category Archives: kohinoor

All I want for Christmas…Advent Calendar of Essentials (!)


Advent calendars covered with glitter, or rattling with chocolates, are almost the best bit of Christmas. The tantalising countdown to the day itself raises expectations to a ridiculous degree.

My calendar is a shortish list of all sorts of mostly arty things that would be very nice to have in a stocking, under a tree, wrapped with a bow, sealed with a kiss.

 


Paul_Cézanne,_1888-90,_Madame_Cézanne_(Hortense_Fiquet,_1850–1922)_in_a_Red_Dress,_oil_on_canvas,_116.5_x_89.5_cm,_The_Metropolitan_Museum_of_Art,_New_York

ONE

I went to this wonderful exhibition a couple of weeks ago – well worth a visit. I normally buy a catalogue but I was a bit pushed for time…

Cézanne Portraits at National Portrait Gallery

This major international exhibition brings together for the first time over fifty of Cézanne’s portraits from collections across the world, including works which have never been on public display in the UK.

Over a working life of some forty-five years, Cézanne made almost 1,000 paintings of which around 160 are portraits. The exhibition  considers the extent to which particular sitters shaped the development of his practise.

Number one


TWO  Number Two

017450300000 analinky

These are a product I use all the time – I get through endless sets.  What I REALLY want for Christmas is for Koh I Noor to make these with big pans of colour so I can use a bigger brush.


THREE

Number Three

The Art Fund

As a child I thought book tokens were a bit of a cop out – a lazy present turning good money into less good money; membership to the Art Fund is the very opposite. This allows the member to have access free, or at reduced rates to galleries all over the country AND the Art fund supports artists and museums.

For over 110 years they have supported museums and galleries, and helped them to buy and display great works of art for everyone to enjoy.

The Art Fund helps museums and galleries in a number of ways:

  • Providing museums and curators with funding for: acquisitions; training and development; and the display of art through tours and exhibitions.
  • Running public appeals when a particular work of art is under threat; for example, in 2014 we ran a successful campaign to save one of the most important industrial archives in the world, the Wedgwood Collection, which documents the evolution of ceramics design over 250 years. Recently we also led a successful appeal with the National Portrait Gallery to save Van Dyck’s final self-portrait for the nation. In recent years we have run several major appeals, raising £45m to save works of art or collections.
  • Promoting hundreds of UK museums and galleries through the National Art Pass, the Art Guide app and more.

FOUR

ERF5001940 encaustic

Number Four

I love to try new things – who doesn’t? I use wax crayons and wax resist techniques all the time so this encaustic beginners set seems to be the logical next step.

 

 

 


FIVE

p-jasshiro brushes

 

Number Five
Just can’t have too many…

 

 

 

 


SIX

Number Sixapron

A good apron is hard to find.  Some people turn up to classes in full body overalls – not a bad idea.  I rather like this, less drastic option.

 

 

 

 


SEVEN

2135615

Number Seven

No list is complete without chocolate.

I don’t know anyone else who likes these so it looks like I get the whole box to myself.


EIGHT

Number Eight

This is TOTALLY ridiculous as half the pleasure of painting is choosing the materials…BUT… it is a very tasty set of delicious paints.

Old holland


NINE

Number Nine

These two Van Gogh paintings of blossom, together with Bonnard’s painting of an Almond Tree, make me yearn for a show of spring flowers.


TEN

Number Ten

Lino printing is occasionally forgotten…dismissed as a school pleasure and rather junior. Now is the time to revisit relief printing. Speedy Carve have a  rubbery material that is very easy to use. Lawrence Printmakers have everything you need for any sort of printing; their beginners kit will use high quality materials. Pfeil tools are the BEST.


I forgot to mention cashmere bed socks.  Get the best you can afford and have a warm and Happy Christmas.

ELEF Art Supplies Birthday Sale


A message from ELEF Art Supplies

To celebrate our 1st Birthday and to say thank you for making us such a success we would like to offer you 25% off our quality art materials for two days just before the summer holidays in July, Wednesday 19th July and Sunday 23rd July.

On the celebration days we will be open Wednesday 19th, 9.00 till 17.30 and Sunday 23rd July 11.00 to 16.00

We can be found about 20 minutes from Winchester, Salisbury and Romsey, about 35 minutes from Southampton in the picturesque village of Stockbridge famous for its River Test and high end shopping. Parking is free and we have no steps to negotiate.

Elefs Art Supplies

High Street

Stockbridge

Hants

SO20 6HB

 

Salisbury end of Stockbridge

Opposite the Greyhound Pub.

 

To Contact ELEF Art Supplies – Tel: 07455452198

Or on the web at elefsartsupplies.co.uk

Or on social media @elefsart supplies

 

Finally can I wish those doing the Hampshire open studio’s with us from the 19th – 28th August 2017, good luck. Free Brochures will be available from here by the 19th July.

 

Lines of Thought


I saw an enthusiastic review of this exhibition and hope to get to see it before it closes.

Poole Museum

Poole Museum Service
4 High St, Poole, Dorset, BH15 1BW

Saturday 3 September – Sunday 6 November 2016

Open daily: 10am – 5pm

Lines of thought

Drawing from Michelangelo to now

Saturday 3 September – Sunday 6 November 2016

FREE

Poole Museum is delighted to be hosting an exhibition of drawings from the British Museum, home to one of the world’s greatest graphic collections. Lines of thought: Drawing from Michelangelo to now explores the importance of drawing as one of the most effective mediums for expressing and representing an artist’s ideas. The exhibition showcases selected drawings from masters such as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo right up to artists working in the present day.

This exhibition will tour to just three UK locations, Poole, Hull and Belfast before travelling internationally. It aims to encourage art students and art lovers to engage with and learn to draw from their local and national drawing collections.

Remember to bring your sketchbook or ask at the museum for drawing materials to have a go at being inspired by the masters! or if you are between 6 and 18 years old why not take part in our drawing competition, Junior Poole Open. 

Generously supported by the Bridget Riley Art Foundation.

Image: Rembrandt (Black chalk and charcoal on paper, an Asian elephant c.1637)

© Trustees of the British Museum

An exhilarating show        The Telegraph

Featured in The Guardian’s 5 of the best…art exhibitions

 

Poole Museum Service
4 High St, Poole, Dorset, BH15 1BW

 

Lavender (and wild flower) Workshop – In a Field by the River Test


Lavender fields in the SUN

Art workshop @riverside_yurt_cafe #artclass #wherwellstudio #stockbridge #landscape #lavender #markerpens
A very busy morning at the Riverside Yurt Cafe. After a frantic session trying varied, and new materials the class were treated to delicious raspberry and lavender jam and clotted cream and scones. They seemed to go down well.

Strong work was produced using a variety of different media.  The two most popular seemed to be black marker pens and the wonderful KOH-I-NOOR  12 Brilliant Water Colour Paint,  (Anilinky).  These are available from Amazon for less than £5.00. Well worth a play. The sun shone all morning and we were warm. This is noteworthy.

Keep a look out for Summer Holiday Classes at the Yurt. These will be for children and adults to work together…scavenger hunts, self portrait classes, picnics and mask making. The picnics are particularly good.  These might be good days out for Grannies and Grandpas with their grandchildren. More to follow
(work in progress)FullSizeRender

NEW -Summer workshops in Riverside Yurt


Enjoy the summer with art workshops in a meadow by the river Test, near Barton Stacey. If the weather turns British we will retire to a yurt with its cafe and wood burning stove. If you wish to enrol for all three classes at once we offer a combined price of 3 courses for £135. Have a look at Riverside Lifestyle’s website for more information and directions http://www.riversidelifestyle.co.uk

Drawing By the River – Rhythm, ebb and flow

15th June, 2016, 9.30am – 12.45pm

£35/ morning.

What could be more lovely than to sit by a river and draw? And what could be more frustrating? Learn through wild experiments how to approach a river drawing and overcome these frustrations.

The beautiful chalk stream that runs through the villages of Barton Stacey and Newton Stacey is the Test. Its glories inspire fishermen and artists alike. The Riverside Yurt Café is in a meadow, by the river and will be our base for a morning drawing workshop.

Spend a morning by the river exploring different drawing techniques. You will be looking at Van Gogh’s mark making and experimenting with marks of your own. Working in charcoal, pencil, pen and ink and graphite you will try to capture something of the magic of the river and its environment. For more information have a look under ‘courses’ or click this link Drawing By the River

This workshop is appropriate for all standards.

£35/ morning. To include regular tea and coffee.

The café serves delicious cakes to tempt you if you wish to purchase them on the day

River

22nd June, 2016, 9.30am-4.30pm

£77/day, including lunch

It is so easy to jump out of a car, to snap a photo with a smart phone and feel we have caught something. A river is a slow experience. Spend a day capturing the moment and a sense of time, place and spirit of the river.

In the beautiful setting of the Riverside Yurt, near Barton Stacey on the Test, you will look at different ways to record being by the river. In this workshop you will look at how to capture a sense of place, season, and the sounds and flora that go with it. We will consider how maps, poetry, music and sounds are able to inform your work.

Using a mixed media approach you will explore the environment, gathering information. You will be drawing things of interest, recording the rhythms, textures and colours of the river, and bringing them together to form a final piece. For more information have a look at our courses or try this link River

This workshop would be appropriate for all abilities.

A delicious Lunch and coffee will be provided.

Lavender Workshop

6th July, 2016, 9.30am – 12.45pm

£39/morning

The meadow by the Riverside Yurt has its own lavender field. This beautiful plant is used in their own bath and body products, and various culinary delicacies. The middle of the morning will be a chance to taste the produce with a cream tea including scones and delicious raspberry and lavender jam.

This workshop will involve drawing, painting and coloured pencils around the lavender, partly still life, and partly landscape. for more information have a look under ‘courses’ or try this link Lavender Workshop

This workshop is appropriate for all standards.

 

The Shipping Forecast, Painting the Squall, the Storm and Poor Visibility


The Shipping Forecast is a well known friend to many, sailors and non-sailors alike. The poetry and rhythms are companions to the insomniac and the early riser.

In this course you will endeavour to capture something of the broadcast, whether you find it alarming, stormy, mysterious, frightening or calming.

We will look at other artists whose work has reflected the sea, storms, or otherwise. You will be drawing and painting, thinking about colours, tones and textures that inspire similar emotions to the Forecast. The Royal Academy have an Abstract Expressionist exhibition in Autumn 2016. Their essay about this might add to your approach to this Class. https://artdrawpaint.com/abstract-expressionism-a-beginners-guide/

The intimate delivery from the radio opens a world beyond the words.


Painting the Squall, the Storm and Poor Visibility

18th and 19th November, 2015

9.30am –  4.00pm

£140/2days

For more information, or if you want to join the course, please contact Kate Measham on: kate@artdrawpaint.com


The forecast contains:

  • details of gale warnings in force,
  • a general synopsis
  • sea-area forecasts containg forecast wind direction and force, weather and visibility.
shipping forecast sea areas
  • The shipping forecast is issued four times a day at 2300, 0500, 1100, 1700 UTC and covers a period of 24 hours from 0000, 0600, 1200 and 1800 UTC respectively.
  • The waters around the British Isles are divided into 31 sea areas show on the map
  • Gale warnings are issued as required (for winds of Gale Force 8 or more).
  • The forecast, excluding the header line, has a limit of 370 words, and has a very strict format.

There are warnings of gales in Rockall, Malin, Hebrides, Bailey, and Fair Isle Humber, Thames. Southeast veering southwest 4 or 5, occasionally 6 later. Thundery showers. Moderate or good, occasionally poor. Tyne, Dogger. Northeast 3 or 4. Occasional rain. Moderate or poor. Rockall, Malin, Hebrides. Southwest gale 8 to storm 10, veering west, severe gale 9 to violent storm 11. Rain, then squally showers. Poor, becoming moderate. Southeast Iceland. North 7 to severe gale 9. Heavy snow showers. Good, becoming poor in showers. Moderate icing.

Art Draw Paint, an introduction to different methods and media


Don’t get stuck doing the same thing time and time again.

Do you remember the pleasure of cutting and sticking, snowflakes made out of newspaper, papier mache masks, wax crayons stacked up layer upon layer, doodling, squashing paint between bits of paper to make strange shapes? All these wonderful physical and visual pleasures that we rarely indulge in as adults. Art Draw Paint hopes to capture that pleasure and excitement, and to encourage method and rigour at the same time.

experiment, explore, discover, play and enjoy

This course, starting at the end of September, will introduce you to  tone, mark making, the importance of line, composition and colour using pencil, graphite, ink, charcoal, a bit of printmaking, mixed media, watercolour, gouache, felt tips,coloured crayons, dye paints, acrylic, and anything else that comes up.


Monday mornings 9.30am – 1.00pm

Starting Monday, 28th September 2015, and each monday until 14th December, except 2nd and 9th November for half term.

10 weeks of classes – £325, or half a term at £180


It will be a busy term learning new techniques and re-visiting methods you may not have used for some time.

This course would be suitable for beginners, the rusty, or those of you who want to try something different with their art.

You will cover the basics and a lot more. At the end of the term you should feel confident enough to have a go at anything, and want to do more.  I will provide some of the materials needed, and ask you to get some things for yourself. I will suggest homework for anyone that wishes to do it.

Reasons to be Cheerful, One, Two, Three…


This is taken from a BBC Magazine article on 14th July, 2015. I am not sure how to reblog from their site so I hope I haven’t broken laws etc. Too good a piece not to share it with you.

We’d all like to know about how to keep our brains as sharp as possible as we age. But what are the best ways to do this, asks Michael Mosley.

Ask anyone over the age of 40 what worries them most about growing older and the answer that comes back is almost always the fear of losing your memory. I worry about the fact that I find it harder than ever to remember names and that without my phone to remind me, I would forget many of my daily appointments.

There are some fairly obvious things to avoid if you want to maintain good brain health. These include smoking, becoming overweight and developing Type 2 diabetes. But what can you positively do to enhance your brain.

Trust Me I’m A Doctor, with Michael Mosley, Gabriel Weston and Dr Chris van Tulleken, is broadcast on BBC Two at 20:00 BST on Wednesday 15 July

Watch the programme on BBC iPlayer

With the help of Newcastle University we recruited 30 volunteers to find out.

Before we began our experiment all our volunteers were subjected to a barrage of tests that measured things like memory, ability to problem solve and general psychomotor speed (reaction times).

Everyone was then fitted with an activity monitor to measure how much and when they were moving.

The volunteers were then randomly allocated to three groups and asked to do a particular activity for the next eight weeks.

One group we simply asked to walk briskly, so that they were just out of breath, for three hours a week. The idea is that walking – in fact any form of vigorous exercise – will keep your brain fed with lots of oxygen-rich blood. This was not a popular choice with some.

“Walking is my least favourite activity,” sighs Ann. (Newcastle does have punishingly steep hills.)
The second group were asked to do puzzles, such as crosswords or Sudoku. Again they had to do it for three hours each week. The reasoning behind this approach is that your brain, like a muscle, benefits from being challenged. Use it or lose it.

The final group were asked to stare at a naked man for three hours a week. Or, to be more accurate, they were asked to take part in an art class which also happened to involve drawing a naked man, Steve.

The results

By the end of our eight-week trial almost everyone in the walking group noticed a big improvement in their general health – how much easier they found managing a particular hill.

Some of the puzzler group had found the puzzles hard at first, but by the end of the eight weeks many were hooked and swapping Sudoku tips.
The most enthusiastic group, however, was undoubtedly the art class. Although a few found attending a class once a week daunting, all of them commented on how much they enjoyed it.

“I have become a compulsive drawer of everything,” says Simone. “I have been out to buy myself some pastel pencils and even a book on ‘How to’.”

So, art equals pleasure, but which group enjoyed the greatest improvements in brain power?

Our scientists redid their battery of cognitive tests and the results were clear-cut. All the groups had got a bit better, but the stand-out group was those who had attended the art class.

It seems the naked man, Steve, had made a big impression.
Gabriel Weston with life model Steve
But why should going to an art class make a difference to things like memory? Clinical psychologist Daniel Collerton, one of our experts from Newcastle University, says that part of the benefit came from learning a new skill. “Learning something new,” he says, “engages the brain in ways that seem to be key. Your brain changes in response, no matter how many years you have behind you.”

Learning how to draw was not only a fresh challenge to our group but, unlike the puzzlers, it also involved developing psychomotor skills. Capturing an image on paper is not just intellectually demanding. It involves learning how to make the muscles in your hand guide the pencil or paintbrush in the right directions.

An additional benefit was that going to the art class meant that for three hours a week they had to stand while drawing or painting. As we’ve shown before on Trust Me I’m a Doctor, standing for longer periods is a good way of burning calories and keeping your heart in good shape.

The art class was also the most socially active, another important thing to bear in mind if you want to keep your brain sharp. This group met regularly outside class, were keen to exchange emails and there was a definite social aspect to this intervention.
All of which meant that this group enjoyed a triple benefit when it came to boosting brain health. One of our volunteers, Lynn, says that learning to draw had produced other, unexpected benefits.

“Part of my job involves writing and pitching bids, which is a difficult and lengthy process,” she explains. “I am dyslexic which is an added hurdle. But having done the art class I found that my writing now flows and my ability to concentrate has improved. It seems to have opened my mind. I’m not sure I can explain it properly, I just know it made a difference.”

It is likely that any group activity which involves being active and learning a new skill will help boost your brain. Ballroom dancing, anyone?

5 things to pack in your holiday art bag


It is holiday time of year – Packing is an art form – I ALWAYS take too many things with me on holiday.


When I go on holiday I have plans, aspirations, good intentions, and hopes – I’m sure you know what I mean. I used to pack accordingly, and on arrival I was almost too scared to open my very heavy art bag.

This does not need to happen. Less is more, as always.

List of Five Essential Items

Famous Fishing cap ready to go in my holiday ART bag
Famous Fishing cap ready to go in my holiday ART bag

  1. 1 sketchbook, no bigger than A4 (possibly a handbag size one as well but you will NEVER use both)
  2.  1 roll masking tape (small)
  3. 2 x Faber Castell thick pencils, 3B and 7B, 2 x diposable WH Smith retractable pencils with rubbers on the end
  4. 2 black waterproof pens of different thicknesses
  5. 1 set KohiNoor soluble dyes and a medium size watercolour brush

You could mistakenly call that a list of 10 items.  I think we can stretch the point.


1. The Sketchbook

I always plan to do major things on holiday so imagine I need a huge pad. This is unnecessary. If the size of sketchbook is not big enough for a picture stick two pieces together with masking tape on the reverse side. Thus any size sheet is possible.

Everyone has their preferred size, shape and quality of paper for their sketch book. I like square books, with a reasonably heavy paper, and a strong, hard cover to lean on. The cover is very important as it will double as drawing board.  Seawhite do a series with 160gsm paper in a firm, black cover.  I use the square one. http://www.cassart.co.uk/seawhite_euro_portrait_sketchbook_with_black_microline_cover_160gsm_50_sheets

You can add another sketch book, but I bet you don’t use it. You can take expensive watercolour paper, but that can be too frightening to touch. Stick with one.

2. The Roll of Masking tape

See above. Don’t get a huge roll – no point and it gets in the way.

3. The Pencils

As with everything else, it is tempting to take too many, ‘just in case…’

My favourite drawing pencil would be a combination of very fine retractable HB and thick, dark, soft 3B and 7B. I always choose an odd number ‘B’. Faber Castell do a set of jumbo pencils, so choose what you like from these.

http://www.cassart.co.uk/drawing/pencils/product_type_graphite_pencils/faber-castell_9000_jumbo_pencils_pack_of_5_black.htm

I would like to be clever about disposable retractable pencils but I always buy mine from WH Smiths. They are very cheap and effective, come in a large pack and have good rubbers on the end. I like the neatness of the rubbers – you are not tempted to rub out large errors, but you can fiddle with small ones.

4. The Pens

I was going to suggest a pack of Staedtler Pigment Liner Set of 6 Black but when I went on the Cass Art website to get a link there were so many sets of interesting pens I feel you should decide for yourself. Do look at the pigment liners – they are excellent, different thicknesses and do the job. Don’t take more than two.

I should experiment more too.

http://www.cassart.co.uk/drawing

5. The Colour

I used to recommend Caran d’Ache Neoart water soluble wax pastel. These are water soluble highly pigmented wax pastels wKoh-i-noor Anilinky Brilliant Dye Watercolour Stacking Set of 24 colourshich can be used either wet or dry. I still use them regularly, but I find they get a bit sticky if you take them somewhere hot. Fine in a cold country.

Instead, I would recommend Koh-i-noor Anilinky Brilliant Dye Watercolour Stacking Set of 24 colours. Emma Faull, painter of beautiful birds, introduced me to them (www.emmafaull.co.uk/). They are bright, colourful dyes that you treat as water colours, and are extraordinarily cheap at under £7.00 for the set. They are not easy to find in shops but I have found them on the internet at:

http://www.rainbowsilks.co.uk/SubCategory.cfm?SubCatId=528


The above are all you need, but I suspect you will want to add a few more things…I would want to, but not many.

I always use a camera, even if it is only my smart phone. I have a sun hat in my bag, a penknife to sharpen the pencils and a large cotton sarong type scarf/rug/sunshade/cushion/shawl. Then I’m done.