Category Archives: devlaminck

Still life in the Still Life


Still Life should NEVER be boring

One of the principal genres (subject types) of Western art – essentially, the subject matter of a still life painting or sculpture is anything that does not move or is dead. Tate website

The Still Life is a place to play with ideas, experiment with materials, try new compositions, most importantly, to take your work forward. Still life gives the artist more freedom in the arrangement of elements within a composition than do paintings of any other types of subjects.

There are a few classes left this term to try new things, play with old ones and to put your own stamp on the genre.

Each class is £45/ea, or £120 for 3. Please contact kate@artdrawpaint.com for more information.

Cezanne does Still LifeCézanne,_Paul_-_Still_Life_with_a_Curtain.jpg

15th November, 9.30am – 12.45pm

Cezanne found in Still Life a vehicle for his revolutionary explorations in geometric spatial organization. For Cézanne, still life was a primary means of taking painting away from an illustrative or mimetic function to one demonstrating  the elements of color, form, and line – a major step towards Abstract art.

You will look at Cezanne’s Still Life, with a fresh version in the studio, learn from his approach and bend it to your will.

 

henri_matisse_mah002

Colour as it Isn’t

22nd November, 9.30am – 12.45pm

Today is all about colour; why stick with a dull copy of the objects in front of you when you can do so much more? You will be playing with the idea of restricted palettes and full on, full blast, sock-it-to-the-Fauves bright and wild palette. See what suits you.

Throw Everything at It

29th November, 9.30am – 12.45pm

Rather a clumsy title but gives some indication of  the mixed media, multi media approach of contemporary practise. During the 20th and 21st century, the notion of the still life has been extended beyond the traditional two dimensional art forms of painting into video art and three dimensional art forms such as sculpture, performance and installation. Some mixed media still-life works employ found objects, photography, video, and sound, and even spill out from ceiling to floor and fill an entire room in a gallery.

You will be restricted by the size of the studio otherwise let your imagination run wild – something akin to Blue Peter on a sugar rush (?).

 

What would the Fauves do?


The Fauves wanted to pique the emotions by reducing forms to their essentials and the use of often saturated colour. They were reacting to the Impressionist painters who worked just before them, and were particularly inspired by Van Gogh and Gauguin. The term Fauves is applied to a fairly loose group including amongst others  Derain, Matisse, Vlaminck, Dufy and early works from Kandinsky. Kandinsky went on to be a pioneer of the Abstract Expressionist – with a landmark exhibition just opened at the Royal Academy.

On Wednesday 28th September there is a course at the Riverside Yurt Cafe, Brandesbury, on the banks of the River Test. The BBC promise a sunny day and we will be looking at the beautiful setting asking “What would the Fauves do?”

Contact me for more details and availability kate@artdrawpaint.com

The course is from 9.30am – 4.00pm, £70 including a light lunch and coffee.

Abstract Expressionist Exhibition


 

I have taken this directly from the Royal Academy Website, but found the photos elsewhere

Abstract Expressionism at the Royal Academy, London

24 September 2016 — 2 January 2017

Book now  Become a Friend

Exploring an unparalleled period in American art, this long awaited exhibition reveals the full breadth of a movement that will forever be associated with the boundless creative energy of 1950s New York.

In the “age of anxiety” surrounding the Second World War and the years of free jazz and Beat poetry, artists like Pollock, Rothko and de Kooning broke from accepted conventions to unleash a new confidence in painting.Often monumental in scale, their works are at times intense, spontaneous and deeply expressive. At others they are more contemplative, presenting large fields of colour that border on the sublime. These radical creations redefined the nature of painting, and were intended not simply to be admired from a distance but as two-way encounters between artist and viewer.It was a watershed moment in the evolution of 20th-century art, yet, remarkably, there has been no major survey of the movement since 1959.

This autumn we bring together some of the most celebrated art of the past century, offering the chance to experience the powerful collective impact of Pollock, Rothko, Still, de Kooning, Newman, Kline, Smith, Guston and Gorky as their works dominate our galleries with their scale and vitality.

ins1957-no-2-clyfford-still
Enter a caption

We will also acknowledge the lesser-known figures who contributed to the development of the movement. Finally, we will include photography and sculpture to complete an ambitious re-evaluation of the phenomenon that saw New York take over from Paris as the capital of the art world.

The exhibition will be curated by the independent art historian Dr David Anfam, alongside Edith Devaney, Contemporary Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts. Dr Anfam is the preeminent authority on Abstract Expressionism, the author of the catalogue raisonné of Mark Rothko’s paintings and Senior Consulting Curator at the Clyfford Still Museum, Denver.

Tone and Colour


paysage auxPainting, colour and tone

I have been planning the next class for my Charcoal into Oil Painting group and wondering how much longer they will put up with me banging on about tone. BUT TONE MATTERS. It doesn’t matter what colour you paint a tree; if you get the tone right it will work.

A strong use of tone releases you from the tyranny of trying to match a colour.

You can play around with any colour, use any palette so long as the tone works. Suddenly colour and painting become more fun.

If you want to come to the colour into tone: tone into colour class or the Charcoal into Oil Painting Course join us for the morning at 9.30am on Thursday 14th May, at Wherwell. It does not matter if you haven’t been with us for earlier classes on this course. The painting element of the morning will be using oils, and we will be doing another tonal drawing using charcoal. More classes in this course over the next few weeks.